Hunting for Sea Glass, Agates, and Fossils at Moolack Beach, Oregon

My wife searching for sea glass, agates, and fossils at water’s edge in Moolack Beach, Oregon. Olympus OM-2 // 28mm f3.5 // Lomography 400

Explore the Oregon Coast:

Moolack Beach just north of Newport, Oregon may be the best place to search for sea glass, agates, and fossils on the entire Oregon Coast. Then again, I haven’t explored every inch of sand just yet, but I can pretty much garuantee that Moolack is a good bet for your next beach foraging trip.

One Shot: Light Leaks at Seal Rock

Light leaks at Seal Rock, Oregon. Olympus OM-10 // 100mm f3.5 // Fujifilm Superia 400
Olympus OM-10 // 100mm f3.5 // Fujifilm Superia 400

Two great things I love come together in a single photo — film photography and beach life. Of course, light leaks aren’t usually something you’re excited to see when you get a roll of negatives developed, but sometimes they make happy accidents like this that are kind of cool.

Fishing for Grunts in Clearwater, Florida

Charter fishing in Clearwater, Florida. Olympus Pen FT // 38mm f1.8 // Ektar 100
Olympus Pen FT // 38mm f1.8 // Ektar 100

Last summer I bought an old Olympus Pen FT half-frame film camera off of eBay and took it on vacation to St. Petersburg, Florida. We went on a half-day fishing trip aboard the Super Queen with Captain Stan and bagged up a bunch of little grunt fish a even a few puffer fish. Even with 94 people on board there was a lot of fishing action. After a ~45 minute boat ride out to the fishing grounds it was all lines in, and all lines down. As soon as my little circle hooked tipped with squid made it to the ocean floor there was a fish nibbling and soon hooked. 

Gone fishin’ — updates on life from Homer, Alaska

Commercial pot fishing in Homer, Alaska.

Go ahead, call me a slacker — it’s true. I only posted one single blog post in 2017, and even that was a link to some freelance work I squeezed in between fishing trips.

I don’t regret it.

I was burned out. I was lazy. I didn’t want to put the time and energy into writing blog posts or editing photos. Hell, I didn’t even feel like carrying around my camera most days, or at all, really. And that’s a new level of lazy, especially when I’ve had the opportunity to explore a beautiful and exotic place like Southcentral Alaska. Screw it, I needed a break.

And now I’m back at it, refreshed and rejuvenated and in between fishing seasons. So here’s an update from a year living in Homer, Alaska:

What it takes to work on a fishing boat in Alaska

Halibut fishing charters Homer Alaska.

Fresh off a six-month trek around South America, my wife and I decided to dive into our next “crazy adventure.” We packed up a trailer in Atlanta and hit the road for Homer, AK, a small town quite literally at the end of the road near the southern tip of the Kenai Peninsula.

Before we left, we didn’t have a place to live or jobs lined up. But the appeal of life in this outdoor paradise in the summer—which thaws the rugged winter landscape and opens up a wide range of adventures, from hiking to rock climbing, and of course fishing—seemed worth the risk…

Read the full story on RootsRated.

30 miles to Shuckstack: A journey thru the Great Smoky Mountains

Shuckstack Fire tower, Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Photo by Clay Duda.

The sky opens up with a light rain as we head out out on the Lost Cove Trail around Fontana Lake. This short stretch of dirt will connect us with the Eagle Creek Trail, which we’ll follow into the remote stretches of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. It was 90-something degrees when we left the valley surrounding Knoxville, but here’s it’s pleasantly hovering in the mid-70s. I can’t complain.

On its face, a 30-mile hike in three days seems like a piece of cake. Equally divided, that’s only 10 miles daily–but as we’re about to find out, legs of this trip aren’t equal, campsites are sporadic, and there’s 5,000-feet of near-vertical mountain between us and the finish line.